Social Media and Digital Discernment

This isn’t the first article I’ve read on this topic, and it certainly won’t be the last as more and more Christian leaders discuss this topic in order to guide the Church. But MacArthur has a great clarity about him that few have, and I recommend this article (to be read in it’s ENTIRETY, not skimmed) to you and hope we can think through these things together. Here’s a snippet near the end that I found relevant, but again, read the whole thing:

While scientists and social critics debate the effects of social media on how we think, one thing remains clear: Christians must guard themselves against becoming theological pancakes. Thanks to the market-driven methodologies of the seeker-sensitive movement, the dumbing down of doctrine has characterized American evangelicalism for decades. In many ways, sites like Twitter and Facebook only exacerbate that problem because they provide a venue in which reductionism and extreme brevity simultaneously coincide with information overload and infinite distraction.

But not every theological truth can be adequately summarized in just a phrase or two. And not every debate can be resolved in just one blog article. Many doctrines require extended time and thought to properly process. Mature believers reflect deeply on the things of God and the truths of His Word.

They are not a mile wide and an inch deep. Instead their lives are marked by rich devotion, focused study, prolonged prayer, and careful mediation. Cultivating those kinds of spiritual disciplines takes time and effort—traits that are rarely prized in the information age.

Social Media and Digital Discernment, John MacArthur
Social Media and Digital Discernment, John MacArthur - PDF Version (much cleaner layout)

Man Up!

There’s a new cover story out from Newsweek titled “Man Up!” Dr. Albert Mohler has some great thoughts on it, but this paragraph really sticks out in my mind as I fulfill my duties as a husband and father:

A true masculinity is grounded in a man’s determination to fulfill his manhood in being a good husband, father, citizen, worker, leader, and friend — one who makes a difference, fulfills a role for others, and devotes his life to these tasks. Most of our fathers went to work early and toiled all day because they knew it was their duty to put bread on the table, a roof over our heads, and a future in front of us. They made their way to ball games and school events dead tired, went home and took care of things, and then got up and did it all over again the next day.

Read Dr. Mohler’s entire post here.

Polygamy Coming to TLC

Apparently polygamy is going mainstream?

TLC is giving a real-life polygamist spin to “Big Love.”

“Sister Wives” will examine a Utah family of fundamentalists Mormons. The Brown clan includes one husband, Kody, and three wives — with a fourth on the way – and 13 children.

Seven-episode half-hour series premieres 10 p.m. Sept. 26.

“We want to tell our story,” second wife Janelle Brown told Daily Variety. “We want people to see for themselves and not what they read.”

TLC has had success showcasing burgeoning families with “Jon and Kate Plus 8,” “19 Kids and Counting” and “Table for 12.”

via Variety.

Wait, Why Did I Vote Again?

“In one brazen act of judicial energy, California’s voters were told that they had no right to define marriage, and thousands of years of human wisdom were discarded as irrational…This decision, whatever its final resolution, serves as an undeniable reminder of the power of Federal judges. A single unelected judge nullified the will of the voters of California as expressed through the electoral process. Those who have been arguing that judicial activism is a fiction will have to look this decision in the face. The New York Times celebrated Judge Walker’s usurpation of the political process, arguing that “there are times when legal opinions help lead public opinions.” The paper, along with proponents of same-sex marriage, clearly hope that this is one of those times.”

- Dr. Albert Mohler


Read Dr. Mohler’s entire article.

100 Years of Boy Scouts

"This American Boy" - Photo ©Shay Thomason

I read this morning that the Boy Scouts of America are celebrating 100 years. 100 years is a milestone for any organization — I definitely praise their accomplishment. I read the “Boy Scout Oath” this morning and couldn’t help think if something like this could ever be written in today’s culture — 100 years later. It currently reads:

“On my honor, I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.”

No doubt if this were rewritten today it would read something like this:

“If I can, I will try to help all countries and obey the Scout Law; to help other people, animals, and the Earth; to keep myself from becoming obese and/or having diabetes, to play video games to keep my mind awake, and know that morality is something that’s different for everyone.”

I really hope it doesn’t come to that — I really do.

Photo © Shay Thomason. All Right Reserved.
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